April 12, 2014

(Source: ancient-odin, via needcaffeine)

March 30, 2014

theatlantic:

42 Years of New York City Street Photography

Artist Flo Fox describes her life creating gritty, clever, and often raunchy images. Despite multiple sclerosis, lung cancer, and partial blindness, Fox continues to capture life in the big city. Flo, which has screened at festivals across the country, comes from director Riley Hooper.

Editor’s Note: The film contains nude photographs.

(Source: 990000)

March 18, 2014
mpdrolet:

A horse and rider watch as the space shuttle Enterprise is towed from a Rockwell International facility in Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base for a year of flight tests, Jan 31, 1977
Art Rogers

mpdrolet:

A horse and rider watch as the space shuttle Enterprise is towed from a Rockwell International facility in Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base for a year of flight tests, Jan 31, 1977

Art Rogers

(via needcaffeine)

February 10, 2014
thegrammys:

Pat Smear & Dave Grohl turn up

thegrammys:

Pat Smear & Dave Grohl turn up

February 4, 2014
I took this picture of Philip Seymour Hoffman in early 2003 while on assignment for The Washington Post. It was, by any measure, a complete failure of an assignment on my part. For one, I probably should have lit it, if only to formalize the situation a bit more. Secondly, I think he was only expecting to be interviewed for the story, not photographed. At any rate, I did coax him out of that nondescript midtown hotel conference room where the interview was taking place (see above photo) out into a long hallway that at least had floor-to-ceiling windows. I asked him to do a simple pose and began shooting my one roll of color negative film. Within a minute or so I began to sense he felt ridiculous because of the poses I was asking him to hold: arms crossed, arms crossed w/ index finger+thumb “steadying” his chin, hands in pockets, etc. I distinctly remember at one point I asked him to kind of rest his chin and cheek into his palm and he responded by deadpanning a slap to his face, with his hand covering half his face, as if to point out how absurd my ideas were. I relented, and we mutually called it a wrap. At the moment, it was hard for me not to think of him as a prick. But I always respected him for sort of calling me out in that way, for holding his ground and not-so-subtly hinting that I needed to think outside the box. Back in the conference room after the interview, I gave him one of my business cards, a postcard of a woman holding a newspaper in Astor Place. In a somewhat brighter mood (or perhaps just wanting me to know he had been busting my chops earlier) he commented that he really liked it and that he knew exactly where it was taken.

I took this picture of Philip Seymour Hoffman in early 2003 while on assignment for The Washington Post. It was, by any measure, a complete failure of an assignment on my part. For one, I probably should have lit it, if only to formalize the situation a bit more. Secondly, I think he was only expecting to be interviewed for the story, not photographed. At any rate, I did coax him out of that nondescript midtown hotel conference room where the interview was taking place (see above photo) out into a long hallway that at least had floor-to-ceiling windows. I asked him to do a simple pose and began shooting my one roll of color negative film. Within a minute or so I began to sense he felt ridiculous because of the poses I was asking him to hold: arms crossed, arms crossed w/ index finger+thumb “steadying” his chin, hands in pockets, etc. I distinctly remember at one point I asked him to kind of rest his chin and cheek into his palm and he responded by deadpanning a slap to his face, with his hand covering half his face, as if to point out how absurd my ideas were. I relented, and we mutually called it a wrap. At the moment, it was hard for me not to think of him as a prick. But I always respected him for sort of calling me out in that way, for holding his ground and not-so-subtly hinting that I needed to think outside the box. Back in the conference room after the interview, I gave him one of my business cards, a postcard of a woman holding a newspaper in Astor Place. In a somewhat brighter mood (or perhaps just wanting me to know he had been busting my chops earlier) he commented that he really liked it and that he knew exactly where it was taken.

February 4, 2014
January 11, 2014
Times Square, New York City, January 20, 2009
Forty minutes before the inauguration of Barack Obama
photo by Cary Conover

Times Square, New York City, January 20, 2009

Forty minutes before the inauguration of Barack Obama

photo by Cary Conover

January 4, 2014
Had the completely unexpected opportunity to photograph NYC from the air a couple months ago while flying to Boston from Atlanta (on the second leg of a trip from Wichita). In the past I had gotten many NYC aerials, but only when flying into or taking off from LaGuardia. Those times resulted in much “flatter” imagery in terms of my angle toward the horizon. For this pass I was at least 30,000 feet up so I’m much more looking down at Manhattan. My heart was beating like crazy when I took this picture, and I consider it a supreme fluke blessing to have had the window seat on this side of the plane while cruising up the Eastern Seaboard.

Had the completely unexpected opportunity to photograph NYC from the air a couple months ago while flying to Boston from Atlanta (on the second leg of a trip from Wichita). In the past I had gotten many NYC aerials, but only when flying into or taking off from LaGuardia. Those times resulted in much “flatter” imagery in terms of my angle toward the horizon. For this pass I was at least 30,000 feet up so I’m much more looking down at Manhattan. My heart was beating like crazy when I took this picture, and I consider it a supreme fluke blessing to have had the window seat on this side of the plane while cruising up the Eastern Seaboard.

July 11, 2013
I became a photographer because photographers did have to be wherever they wanted to take pictures, or at least their cameras did. And because there was some connection, inherent in the nature of the medium, between that place and its picture. And the viewers, despite any pitfalls or roadblocks put in their way, could still to some extent be there too. This has always struck me as somewhat amazing.- That magic little black box enables one to leave, in a small way and for a short while, one’s own time and space and to occupy, maybe only superficially, another time and space: a then and there that really existed as well as a here and now. Photographs are both real images and imaged realities. This is both unique among media and new in human experience.
May 31, 2013